When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together.

Drawn Together Across Generations And Language Barriers {Giveaway}

Disney Hyperion sent me a copy of Drawn Together to check read with my girls and is partnering with me for a giveaway! All opinions are 100% my own and this post contains affiliate links. When you make a purchase using an affiliate link, I may earn a small commission at no cost to you.

When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together. When a young boy goes to visit his grandfather, their communication comes in the form of a different kind of art that isn’t language, and they are Drawn Together with their sketch books and art. I am a first generation Russian-American, my Mama, grandmother and great-grandmother only spoke Russian. I learned Russian because of the amount of time I spent with my great-grandmother while my mother worked.

When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together.

Drawn Together Across Generations And Language Barriers

I recall a time when I was sitting in the back of my great-grandmother’s building, and she was sitting on a bench with another older lady who was of Asian descent. Neither spoke English, neither spoke a common language, but somehow they found a way to communicate. It is a memory that I have carried with my all my life, and a lesson I learned in that language is not the only form of communication. Across generations and language barriers, people can always find a way to be Drawn Together, especially through art or visual cues.

When my girls were little I used sign language as a means of communication to help them tell me what they needed. I taught them the basic sign language I learned through Baby Sign Language books you can purchase just for this purpose. Just as we find ways to communicate with our children before they develop language, we can find ways to communicate with others. Drawn Together by Minh Le reminds us that communication comes in many forms and connecting with those we love can break language barriers.

When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together.

 

About Drawn Together

Author Minh Lê and Caldecott-winning illustrator Dan Santat join forces in a heartwarming story of a grandfather and his grandson as they learn to overcome their language barrier through a shared love of art and storytelling. When a young boy visits his grandfather, their lack of a common language leads to confusion, frustration, and silence. But as they sit down to draw together, something magical happens—with a shared love of art and storytelling, the two form a bond that goes beyond words. With spare, direct text by Minh Lê and luminous illustrations by Caldecott Medalist Dan Santat, this stirring picture book about reaching across barriers will be cherished for years to come. Drawn Together is recommended for children ages 3-5 and you can find more great picture books for young children here.When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together.

About the Author

Minh Lê is a writer but, like his grandfather, is a man of few words. He is a national early childhood policy expert, author of Let Me Finish! (illustrated by Isabel Roxas), and has written for the New York Times, the Horn Book, and the Huffington Post. A first-generation Vietnamese-American, he went to Dartmouth College and has a master’s in education from Harvard University. Outside of spending time with his beautiful wife and sons in their home near Washington, DC, Minh’s favorite place to be is in the middle of a good book. Visit Minh online at minhlebooks.com or on Twitter @bottomshelfbks. Minh Lê’s debut, Let Me Finish!, received critical acclaim, and this new picture book once again demonstrates his sensitivity to readers and mastery of the form.

When language barriers exist across generations, there are many other things that can be done which allow two people to be Drawn Together.

About the Illustrator

Dan Santat is the author and illustrator of the Caldecott Award-winning The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend, as well as The Cookie FiascoAfter the Fall, and others. He is also the creator of Disney’s animated hit, The Replacements. Dan lives in Southern California with his wife, two kids, and a menagerie of pets. Visit him at dantat.com.

Illustrator Video

Dan Santat’s illustrations are robust, vibrant, and packed with emotion, a perfect match for Minh Lê’s poignant, and ultimately cheerful, story. Learn about the Drawn Together art process from Dan Santat himself!

What lessons have you learned from your grandparents or others about being Drawn Together without using words to communicate?

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Drawn Together & Art Easel Prize Pack Giveaway

One (1) winner will receive:

One lucky reader will have the chance to win the Drawn Together prize pack, as mentioned above, ARV $100. The Drawn Together giveaway will run from the time posted until 11:59pm EST on 6/25/18. All entrants must be at least 18 years of age or older and residents of the United States. You must use the Rafflecopter below to enter. Good Luck!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Disclosure: The materials, above mentioned prize, samples and/or compensation, were provided by Disney Hyperion for sharing this information and giveaway; however, I am not responsible for the prize fulfillment. This Drawn Together post was sponsored by Disney Hyperion. The sponsor of this event will be responsible for fulfillment of prize. The prize may be sent via FedEx or USPS. No P.O. Boxes please. Only one entrant per household (ip address). One winner per household, email address, IP address or home address. Winner is subject to eligibility verification. No purchase is necessary to enter. Void where prohibited by law. The odds of winning are based on the number of entries received. All entries are optional; however, the more tasks you complete the greater your chances of winning. Confirmed Winner(s), via Random.org, will be contacted by email. Winner(s) have 48 hours to respond before a new winner is chosen. This event is in no way associated with, sponsored, administered, or endorsed by Facebook, Twitter, Google, Pinterest or any other social media network. The disclosure is done in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission 10 CFR, Part 255 Guides Concerning the use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Mama E

Multitasking mama to 3 living in Miami. Blogging about parenting, lifestyle, cooking and traveling. Covering everything from diapers to dorm rooms. Ask me anything, I've done it all.

Comments (17)

  • Every kid on both sides of my family had an easel….such a wonderful way to build creativity!

    Reply
  • A hug speaks volumes, a hand grasp does also. Putting an arm around someone or putting your arm through theirs
    is a signal of caring.

    Reply
  • Thanks

    Reply
  • My grandmother used to swipe her pointer fingers to say tsk tsk tsk when we misbehaved.

    Reply
  • My grandparents always taught us you speak more through actions. Bake someone a cake, give a friendly smile. Mod, just acknowledge people.

    Reply
  • I learned growing up with my family that you just learn how to read one another. You can tell just by looking at each other whether your happy, sad, angry or you better do it now look. You also can see how much you are loved by each other, just by one simple look without having to say a word.

    Reply
  • Sometimes it is easier to talk to your kids when they are drawing, as then they are concentrating on something else and they just talk when asked a question, or about the day.

    Reply
  • We were taught to show our love for one another by taking care of each other and doing things for one another!

    Reply
  • I learned how to be in the kitchen and show your love to your family by making delicious meals and treats.

    Reply
  • I had an easel for my drawing when Ii was growing up. I love to draw even to this day and my son has inherited my talent.

    Reply
  • My dad’s side of the family came here from Naples, Italy. They arrived on Ellis Island and the rest is history. My grandparents had children late in life. My grandma had 4 kids which included a set of fraternal twins. They spoke Italian, but they didn’t teach their children or us. Their reasoning was that they were in America now and this should now be their preferred language. Even though they picked up some Italian just from listening to their parent’s conversations. My mom’s side, I don’t know that much about since they moved to California when I was very young. I knew that they were Of German descent. I never heard them say anything that wasn’t English. My dad’s dad died days after John F. Kennedy and my mom’s dad died in 1978, but we hardly saw them, so even hugs or kisses weren’t given! Plus my dad dropped dead of a heart attack in 1987, so our kids didn’t hardly have any grandparents! My husband never knew his dad. His mom died died a long time ago and my mom died in 2005. She had MS and was in a nursing home when she died. We always said that when we became grandparents that we were definitely going to be hands on and close with our grandkids! We always give them hugs, kisses, and we always part ways with an ‘I love you!’ We wouldn’t have it any other way.!!

    Reply
  • my four kiddos would go nuts for this prize. thanks for the chance!

    Reply
  • “What lessons have you learned from your grandparents or others about being Drawn Together without using words to communicate?” You could see they were wise enough not to always offer their opinions. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor!

    Reply
  • My brother is a professional artist but reading about this book brought back memories of how much he would practice when we were little.

    Reply
  • My gramma’s was anyone can say the right thing, but when they do the right thing, that’s what you’re looking for. My grampa was all about finding the good – no one is all good or all bad, so look for the good and you will find it.

    Reply
  • my grandparent would say do not go to bed angry if you pissed at the brother or sister go tlak to them

    Reply
  • We were taught to by my grandparents to show kindness and compassion to one another especially when a family member was in need. To never abandon them and love and take care of each other.

    Reply

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