Milestones are important for development and go beyond crawling, talking and walking. My French Toast can help measure your child's milestones by age five!

Milestones Beyond Crawling, Talking and Walking: Milestones By Age Five

Today’s post – Milestones Beyond Crawling, Talking and Walking: Milestones By Age Five – is made possible with support from the Association of University Centers on Disabilities through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Learn the Signs. Act Early.” program. All opinions are my own. This post contains an affiliate link.

 
Ask me when each of my children first walked and I can recall it all very clearly, even after so many years. J, 20 now, walked at nine months old, Em at one year old (her birthday party actually), and Anabelle at 14 months. At each doctor visit I was always asked about certain milestones, laughing, crawling, and sitting up. Eventually those questions all but disappeared – I figured I had scored an A in parenting. I had no idea that these questions should have continued, in fact there’s an entire list of milestones by age five. Now that I know, I’m sharing these milestones by age five with you – along with an easy and yummy recipe for testing one of these important developmental milestones with your child.

Milestones are important for development and go beyond crawling, talking and walking. My French Toast can help measure your child's milestones by age five!Milestones By Age Five

Somewhere after walking and talking I stopped looking at milestones, until Anabelle came along. Since she was a preemie there were some concerns over delays in her hitting the milestones. We were told by age two she should be all caught up, but her school had some concerns and we took her for evaluation at Early Steps. Seems she was fine after all, and her delayed speech actually had more to do with her ears having fluid as well as her own attitude in when she wanted to answer someone. I was relieved, but also anxious, had we missed any important milestones with Em?

Milestones are important for development and go beyond crawling, talking and walking. My French Toast can help measure your child's milestones by age five!

Em recently turned five years old and has been in preschool since she was 18 months old. Fortunately because of school there’s extra eyes on her development. Including hitting all the milestones by age five. Developmental milestones aren’t set in stone, they are just a guideline of things most children can do by a certain age. Once your child has reached their 5th birthday, you can take a look at the checklist, and discuss any concerns about development at your next pediatric visit. 

Practicing Fork and Knife Skills – Milestones By Age Five

Developmental milestones by age five include tracking of social, emotional, language and communication, cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving), as well as movement and physical development. One of the milestones I realize we have yet to hit is using a fork along with a table knife. It dawned on me that anytime we serve Em, her food is pre-cut, and if we happen to be out at a restaurant we always remove the knife from her setting. I recall her using a plastic knife before, assuring me she knew how because they had practiced at school. How did I miss this important milestone – a checklist of milestones by age five surely would have kept us on track.

Milestones are important for development and go beyond crawling, talking and walking. My French Toast can help measure your child's milestones by age five!

Realizing how important this milestone was, I ordered Em a new cutlery set which included a table knife appropriate for her age. Anabelle wants to learn to use a knife just like her big sister, but we are still working on her scissor cutting skills (another milestone). Wanting to ease Em into the use of a fork and knife I decided making something easy like French Toast would work as an introduction. But she totally was way ahead of me, and decided to test out her skills on the strawberries too – she even cut up strawberries on her sister’s plate!

Milestones are important for development and go beyond crawling, talking and walking. My French Toast can help measure your child's milestones by age five!

Quick and Easy French Toast Milestone Measure

Ingredients

-Challah Bread or French Bread
-Milk
-Egg
-Cinnamon Sugar
-Cooking Spray
-Strawberries

Directions

1. Cut bread into 1 inch thick pieces
2. Sprinkle cinnamon sugar into bowl of milk and dip bread lightly on both sides
3. Lay bread to side over slotted rack to rest for one minute
4. Beat eggs in separate bowl
5. Dip bread into egg bowl lightly coating both sides thoroughly
6. Lay bread to side over slotted rack to rest for one minute and excess egg to drip off
7. Spray your pan with cooking spray and place dipped bread on pan
8. Cook on medium for a few minutes on each side until golden brown
9. Remove from heat and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar
10. Garnish with strawberries and serve.

Measuring your child’s milestone development can be fun. Em loves to help out in the kitchen, and really appreciates food she helps cook. She loved this French Toast and we’ll be using it to help practice her fork and knife skill going forward. Be sure to order a free Parent Kit, which includes a Milestone Moments booklet with checklists for ages 2 months to 5 years and a growth chart. The Parent kit is available in English or Spanish. Or you can download the CDC’s Milestones Tracker App on iTunes for free. Learn the Signs. Act Early. and stay informed on your child’s development for discussing any concerns with your child’s pediatrician.

Learn the Signs. Act Early. and join the conversation online #MilestoneMonday

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Mama E

Multitasking mama to 3 living in Miami. Blogging about parenting, lifestyle, cooking and traveling. Covering everything from diapers to dorm rooms. Ask me anything, I've done it all.

Comments (17)

  • Such important information. I always said a child will due things in their own time but, I was fortunate I didn’t hv to worry. They were all quick to do everything. My grandaughter had a stroke inside of r daughter before she was born so I’ve learned so much

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  • that’s some hard work. :/

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  • Awesome, Em! Thank you for allowing us to serve you with Kiddobloom utensils. With much love, Kiddobloom

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  • Lots to learn. Thanks for the recipe too

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  • What a good read. I am a believer in they will do things when they are ready but i dont feel its bad to take advices of the doctor.

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  • I never knew there were so much more milestones to worry about. Really important that you shared this.

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  • I was always so excited every time my kid hit a milestone. I never worried about him hitting the milestones, I just enjoyed watching as he learned each one and got excited about having learned something new.

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  • wow i never knew there where all these milestones all the way to 5 yrs old

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  • wow i had no idea there were all these milestones

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  • Wow! So many milestones. My children are grown now but it is nice to have these for my grandchildren. And this recipe looks delicious! Thanks!

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  • Thanks for the great post. There is a lot of things going on before age 5.

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  • Great guide!

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  • This is such a great post, thanks for sharing! I have three kiddos ages 8, 4, and 3 so I know that each can move at their own pace and hit milestones at different times. I was actually surprised by how quickly my 3 year old has been hitting hers, but I realize this is most likely from the influence of her older siblings. 🙂

    Reply
  • True! I never really noticed it as my oldest is 5… But when I signed her up for Kinder… We have never taught her to tie shoes 😂 mine are 5 3 and 1 so I’ve done slip one or zip ups always! So that’s our summer goal!

    Reply
  • This was a great article to read. My grandchildren are a little past five now and I think they are right on. Thank you so much for sharing this

    Reply
  • I hated to work when my kids were little as I worked long hours and missed most milestones.

    Reply

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